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Leslie Diane Button

September 25, 2019

Leslie Diane Button, age 70, of Meridian, Idaho passed away Wednesday, September 25, 2019 surrounded by her family. She was born on July 1st 1949 to the late Russell and Elizabeth Graham of Nampa, Idaho. She had fond memories of growing up with her sisters in Oregon and Idaho and later finished her schooling in Washington. She married Larry Potts in August of 1966. They were later divorced. Larry and Diane had two children, Brian Potts and Terri Torres. She retired from Pioneer Title after 31 years as an Escrow Assistant. She made many life-long friends there.

She had many hobbies which included traveling, crocheting, quilting, planting flowers, shopping for antiques, fabric and yarn with her sister and aunt and spending time with her Bible Study ladies. In 2004 she married Glen Button. Her and Glen had 5 years together before his passing in 2009. They made many memories together which included building projects, a trip to Hawaii, countless mountain adventures and daily mochas! Her constant love for Jesus and her family was first in her life. She was a kind soul who will be missed dearly by her family, friends, co-workers and neighbors. One of her favorite Bible verses was Psalm 118:24, This is the day the Lord has made; Let us rejoice and be glad in it.

She is survived by her son, Brian (Jennifer) Potts of Emmett and daughter Terri of Boise; grandchildren, Emily, Madelyn, Trisha and Ryan; and one great-grandson, Gabriel; her sisters, Judy (Jerry) Legg, Pam Perkins, Joan (John) King and Caroline Graham; her Aunts, Leta Graham and Ida Hodges and many nieces, nephews and cousins.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Glen; her sister, Shirley; her uncle Les, aunt Maxine; and her aunt Margaret.

Donations may be made in Diane’s name to MSTI at 100 E Idaho St. Boise, Idaho 83712.

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